HPIO news

ICYMI: New HPIO Health Value Dashboard ranks Ohio near bottom

Last week, the Health Policy Institute of Ohio released the latest edition of its Health Value Dashboard.

Ohio ranks 47 in the nation in health value compared to other states and D.C. according to the latest edition of the Dashboard. That means that Ohioans live less healthy lives and spend more on health care than people in most other states. Ohio’s overall health value ranking was 47 in 2014, 46 in 2017 and 46 in 2019.

The Dashboard found that Ohio’s healthcare spending is mostly on costly downstream care to treat health problems. This is largely because of a lack of attention and effective action in the following areas:

  • Children. Childhood adversity and trauma have long-term consequences
  • Equity. Ohioans with the worst outcomes face systemic disadvantages
  • Prevention. Sparse public health workforce leads to missed opportunities for prevention

Ohio ranks near bottom in latest HPIO Health Value Dashboard

Ohio ranks 47 in the nation in health value compared to other states and D.C. according to the latest edition of the Health Value Dashboard, which was released earlier this week by the Health Policy Institute of Ohio.

“Ohioans live less healthy lives and spend more on health care than people in most other states,” according to the Dashboard.

Ohio has consistently ranked near the bottom on health value in each of the four editions of the Dashboard. Ohio’s overall health value ranking was 47 in 2014, 46 in 2017 and 46 in 2019. 

The Dashboard found that Ohio’s healthcare spending is mostly on costly downstream care to treat health problems. This is largely because of a lack of attention and effective action in the following areas:

  • Children. Childhood adversity and trauma have long-term consequences
  • Equity. Ohioans with the worst outcomes face systemic disadvantages
  • Prevention. Sparse public health workforce leads to missed opportunities for prevention

The Dashboard is a tool to track Ohio’s progress toward health value — a composite measure of Ohio’s performance on population health and healthcare spending. In ranked profiles, the Dashboard examines Ohio’s rank and trend performance relative to other states across seven domains. In addition, through a series of equity profiles, the Dashboard highlights gaps in outcomes between groups for some of Ohio’s most systematically disadvantaged populations.

The Dashboard includes examples of nine evidence-informed policies that could be adopted by Ohio policymakers and private-sector partners to make Ohio a leader in health value.


HPIO fact sheet highlights connection between affordable housing, health equity

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio released a new fact sheet titled “Housing Affordability and Health Equity,” which explores the connection between affordable and safe housing and health.

According to the fact sheet, “Quality, affordable housing is vital for Ohio families to maintain stable employment and long-term health. Low wages, a lack of safe and affordable housing and the impacts of racism and housing discrimination result in many Ohioans spending a significant portion of their income on poor quality housing in neighborhoods that are disconnected from necessary resources, including high-quality health care and high paying jobs.”

The fact sheet notes:

  • About one-fifth of white Ohio renters (21%) spent over 50% of their income on housing in 2017. This housing cost burden was even higher for Latino and Black Ohioans.
  • Many workers were not paid enough to afford a 2-bedroom apartment at fair market rent (FMR) in Ohio in 2020.
  • There were only 42 affordable rental units for every 100 renter households with incomes at or below the poverty line or 30% area median income in Ohio in 2019.

The fact sheet also includes links to existing state plans and resources that include evidence-based strategies policymakers can focus on to improve housing affordability in Ohio.


HPIO fact sheet outlines link between K-12 student wellness, health equity

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio released a new fact sheet titled “K-12 Student Wellness and Health Equity,” which explores the connection between student wellness and health.

According to the fact sheet, “Research has shown that schools can positively impact academic success and educational attainment through student wellness and health improvement efforts, such as school-based health care, drug and violence prevention and social-emotional learning programs.”

The fact sheet notes:

  • Nearly one quarter of Black children in Ohio (22%) were chronically absent during the 2019-2020 school year, compared to 8% of white children in Ohio.
  • The percent of high school students in Ohio who did not graduate in four years was 3.2 times higher for students with low incomes compared to peers with higher incomes.
  • Among children in Ohio with special healthcare needs who needed care coordination, 41% did not receive needed care coordination in 2018-2019.
  • The suicide rate for youth, ages 8-17, in Appalachian counties in Ohio was 1.5 times higher than the overall youth suicide rate in 2018.

The fact sheet also includes links to existing state plans and resources that include strategies policymakers can focus on to improve K-12 student wellness.


HPIO fact sheet explores COVID-19 impact on ACEs

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio has released a new fact sheet, “The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs).”

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented health, social and economic challenges for all Ohioans. These challenges are far-reaching, including loss of loved ones, unemployment, business closures, disruption to K-12 education and increased stress and social isolation.

The full extent of the impacts of the pandemic on children and youth will take years to discern. However, early indicators of childhood adversity signal the impact of the pandemic on potential challenges to Ohio’s health, well-being and economic vitality for years to come. The fact sheet includes links to recent reports that provide evidence-informed policies that can be implemented in Ohio to prevent and mitigate the impacts of ACEs and eliminate disparities.

The fact sheet is the latest in a series of HPIO publications and an online resource page to examine the impact of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in Ohio. Other publications include:


HPIO fact sheet outlines link between transit, health equity

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio released a new fact sheet titled “Transit and Health Equity,” which explores the connection between transportation access and health.

According to the fact sheet, “Transportation access is critical for good health across the lifespan.” The fact sheet notes:

  • Transportation to prenatal care and healthy food can improve birth outcomes and reduce infant mortality disparities.
  • Reliable transportation offers better access to jobs which supports self-sufficient employment, and in turn, can lead to higher income and better physical and mental health.
  • Transportation access connects older adults to friends and family, health care, volunteer opportunities and other activities and supports necessary for healthy aging.

The fact sheet also includes links to existing state plans that include strategies for policymakers to consider for improving transit.


ACEs cost Ohio $10 billion a year in healthcare costs, new HPIO analysis finds

First-of-its kind analysis by the Health Policy Institute of Ohio has found that if adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are eliminated, more than $10 billion in annual healthcare and related expenses could be avoided in Ohio.

The analysis is included in a new HPIO policy brief, Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): Economic Impact of ACEs in Ohio. The study also found that focusing action on reducing ACEs, particularly those associated with behavioral health, can yield significant savings. For example, more than $4.5 billion in annual spending to treat depression in Ohio is attributable to ACEs.

“The research is clear that ACEs result in both significant health and economic impacts,” the brief states. “Economic costs from ACEs are incurred across the public and private sectors, including substantial costs to the healthcare system. The economic burden of ACEs also impacts the state child protection, behavioral health, criminal justice and education systems, as well as private sector businesses. By preventing and mitigating the impacts of ACEs, policymakers and others can put Ohio on a path towards improved health value.”

The brief is the second in three planned briefs as part of HPIO’s Ohio ACEs Impact Project. In August 2020, HPIO released the first brief, Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): Health impact of ACEs in Ohio.


Welcome to the first racism and health special edition of Ohio Health Policy News

As the Health Policy Institute of Ohio wrote in its statement on racism and health last year, “The data and research evidence are clear that racism is a systemic and ongoing public health crisis with serious consequences for the health of Ohioans.”

In order to keep the connection between racism and health front and center for policymakers, HPIO is devoting the last edition of Ohio Health Policy News each month to the topic. We will continue to include stories about health equity throughout the month, but these special editions will put a spotlight on the issue.


In case you missed it: HPIO fact sheet outlines actions needed to eliminate racial disparities in infant mortality

Earlier this week, HPIO released a new fact sheet titled “Taking action: Eliminating racial disparities in infant mortality.”

The fact sheet highlights that, “For many years, Ohio’s infant mortality rate has been higher than most other states... Ohio’s policymakers and health leaders have acted on this issue through multiple advisory committees, collaborative efforts, investments, legislation and other policy changes.”

The fact sheet includes troubling infant mortality disparities data (see graphic below) and information on what can drive change and move Ohio forward. It highlights three action steps that are needed to eliminate racial disparities in infant mortality. Future efforts must:

  • Dismantle racism and address its consequences
  • Improve health across the life course, not just pregnancy
  • Maintain improvements in access to clinical care, while also advancing meaningful policy changes to improve community conditions

FactSheet_IMRacialDisparities_Figure1


HPIO fact sheet outlines actions needed to eliminate racial disparities in infant mortality

HPIO has released a new fact sheet titled “Taking action: Eliminating racial disparities in infant mortality.”

The fact sheet highlights that, “For many years, Ohio’s infant mortality rate has been higher than most other states... Ohio’s policymakers and health leaders have acted on this issue through multiple advisory committees, collaborative efforts, investments, legislation and other policy changes.”

In December 2020, Gov. Mike DeWine announced the creation of a new task force focused on eliminating racial disparities in infant mortality by 2030. The task force will host listening sessions in 11 counties, providing an opportunity for members to learn about promising programs, evaluation results and barriers to improving maternal and infant health for Black families.

The fact sheet includes troubling infant mortality disparities data and information on what can drive change and move Ohio forward. It highlights three action steps that are needed to eliminate racial disparities in infant mortality. Future efforts must:

  • Dismantle racism and address its consequences
  • Improve health across the life course, not just pregnancy
  • Maintain improvements in access to clinical care, while also advancing meaningful policy changes to improve community conditions