HPIO news

New HPIO fact sheets explore racial, geographic differences in impact of Ohio addiction crisis

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio has released two new fact sheets that detail the impact of the addiction crisis on different groups of Ohioans.  

The fact sheets are being released in conjunction with the recently published HPIO policy brief Taking Action to Strengthen Ohio’s Addiction Response.

The first fact sheet, HPIO Addiction Evidence Project: Insights on addiction and race, provides data and information on differences in addiction outcomes by race, and the factors that drive those differences, with a focus on Black Ohioans.

“Ohio has taken many steps to prevent addiction and improve treatment access for people with substance use disorder,” the fact sheet states. “However, addiction remains a concern across the state, affecting people from every community and inequitably impacting Ohioans of color.”

The second fact sheet, HPIO Addiction Evidence Project: Insights on addiction and geography, presents information about differences in downstream addiction-related harms, and the factors driving those differences, across Ohio communities based on region and county type.

According to the fact sheet, “Addiction-related harms remain a concern across the state and there are clear regional disparities in economic conditions and access to life-saving services that exacerbate those harms. Going forward, Ohio can do more to ensure that where someone lives does not increase the likelihood they will die of a drug overdose.”


New HPIO policy brief outlines ways for Ohio policymakers to take action to address addiction

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio has released a new policy brief, “Taking Action to Strengthen Ohio’s Addiction Response.”

The publication is the final brief in the HPIO Addiction Evidence Project and includes:

  • An update on where Ohio stands on addiction-related trends
  • A summary of Ohio’s addiction policy strengths, gaps, challenges and opportunities
  • A prioritized set of nine policy recommendations

Over the past 20 years, Ohioans have pulled together to address the complex challenges of addiction in unprecedented ways. Now, with pending opioid settlements on the horizon, there is an opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of Ohio’s efforts to date and plan for what should happen next.

The brief identifies the following as the most important addiction policy priorities to address:

  • Immediate: Save lives by ending fentanyl overdoses
  • Next 2 years: Reform the criminal justice system to support recovery and employment
  • Long term: Continue to strengthen Ohio’s prevention-treatment-recovery continuum

New HPIO fact sheet highlights opportunities for policymakers to support health, well-being of Ohioans of color

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio has released a new fact sheet that outlines actions state and local policymakers can take to support the health and well-being of Ohioans of color and move Ohio toward a more economically vibrant and healthier future.

“Ensuring that every Ohioan has a fair opportunity to achieve good health and well-being is a shared value in both the public and private sectors,” the fact sheet states. “However, Ohioans of color continue to face barriers to health where they live, work, learn, play and age.”

The fact sheet, titled “State and Local Policymakers: Ensuring Ohioans of Color Have a Fair Opportunity for Good Health,” is the first in a series of three that provides action steps that can be taken to address the health impacts of racism. The publication highlights eight action steps that policymakers can take, including examples from policymakers in Ohio and across the country. 

“Government can play a strong role in educating, encouraging and creating opportunity for private sector partners and the public to take action,” according to the fact sheet.  “Many states, counties and municipalities are promoting health by understanding and addressing unfair and unjust policies and practices.”

The remaining two fact sheets in the series will provide information on how private sector partners, community groups and individuals can take action to advance equitable opportunities for Ohioans of color.


HPIO analysis identifies 12 strategies to prevent childhood trauma in Ohio

A new policy brief, “Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): A strategic approach to prevent ACEs in Ohio,” identifies 12 cost-beneficial strategies that state leaders can use to prevent adverse childhood experiences.

Earlier analysis from HPIO’s Ohio ACEs Impact project found that more than one-third of Ohio adults (36%) reported exposure to two or more ACEs. And first-of-its-kind analysis by HPIO estimated that more than $10 billion in annual healthcare and related spending could be avoided in Ohio if exposure to ACEs was eliminated.

“ACEs are not inevitable and Ohioans are resilient,” the new report states. “Exposure to ACEs does not have to determine future hardship. There are strategies that state policymakers and others can deploy to prevent ACEs and safeguard the well-being of Ohio children and families who have experienced adversity and trauma.” 

The report also highlights steps Ohio’s public and private leaders can take to ensure that communities across the state are equipped to support children and families that are most at risk for experiencing adversity and trauma – including Ohioans of color and Ohioans with low incomes, disabilities and/or who live in urban and Appalachian areas.


New HPIO Health Value Dashboard fact sheet provides closer look at public health and prevention data

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio has released a new Health Value Dashboard fact sheet titled “A Closer Look at Public Health and Prevention.”

The fact sheet provides additional information on the public health and prevention metrics included in HPIO’s 2021 Health Value Dashboard, with a focus on state and local public health. Because most Dashboard data was collected prior to 2020, this fact sheet describes the status of public health in Ohio prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The large number of deaths in 2020 caused by COVID-19 and a new surge in overdose deaths indicate major threats to health that further strained the public health system over the past year.

Public health and prevention is one of seven topic areas included in the 2021 Health Value Dashboard. Ohio’s strengths in this area include decreases in opioid prescribing and senior falls. Overall, however, Ohio performed worse than many other states, ranking 32nd out of 50 states and D.C. on an overall ranking of public health and prevention metrics. Public health workforce, funding and emergency preparedness and response stand out as areas needing improvement.

“From addressing the addiction crisis to combatting infectious disease, public health and prevention play an important role in ensuring that Ohioans live longer, healthier lives and rely less on clinical care,” according to the fact sheet. “While Ohio has made some improvements in preventing illness and injuries, policymakers and others can take additional actions to strengthen Ohio’s public health system.”


HPIO report summarizes maternal, infant health outcomes from Columbus housing project

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio recently completed a final report summarizing the outcome and process evaluation results of CelebrateOne's Healthy Beginnings at Home (HBAH) housing stabilization pilot program, which is designed to improve maternal and infant health outcomes for families with low incomes in the Columbus area. A nine-page executive summary and a longer final report are available. 

The report includes five key findings and 16 recommendations and policy changes to strengthen HBAH replication and improve housing and health outcomes for pregnant women and their families. Insights from the evaluation can be valuable for other programs in Ohio that aim to improve maternal and infant health through housing interventions. 

This report builds upon the following work: 


ICYMI: HPIO brief explores connections between criminal justice and health

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio last week released a new brief titled, Connections between Criminal Justice and Health.

According to the brief, “The research evidence is clear that poor mental health and addiction are risk factors for criminal justice involvement and that incarceration is detrimental to health.”

The brief highlights the many factors that impact both criminal justice and health outcomes, finding that:

  • There is a two-way relationship between criminal justice and health. Mental health and addiction challenges can lead to arrest and incarceration, and incarceration contributes to poor behavioral and physical health for many Ohioans.
  • Racism and community conditions contribute to criminal justice involvement and poor health. Racist and discriminatory policies and practices and community conditions, such as poverty, housing instability and exposure to trauma, lead to increased criminal justice involvement and drive poor health outcomes.
  • Improvement is possible. There are evidence-informed policy solutions to combat the drivers of criminal justice involvement and poor health outcomes.

The brief includes 15 specific evidence-informed policy options focused on:

  • Supporting mental well-being and improving crisis response for people at higher risk of criminal justice involvement
  • Reducing the number of people incarcerated in Ohio
  • Improving health for people who are currently or formerly incarcerated
  • Improving community conditions for people who are at higher risk of criminal justice involvement

HPIO seeks new board directors

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio is seeking candidates for its Board of Directors.

The call for candidates and application are posted on the HPIO website

The HPIO Board of Directors is comprised of leaders from the nonprofit, for-profit and public sectors who are dedicated to the organization’s mission and share our commitment to equity. HPIO and its board are built on a foundation of shared values — fact-based and data-driven analysis; integrity and transparency; diversity and inclusion; ethical decision-making; relevancy; and collaboration and partnership.  

Selected board directors will understand how state policy is created and will have achieved leadership stature in healthcare, business, government, philanthropy or the nonprofit sector. Their accomplishments will allow them to attract other well-qualified, high-performing board directors. 

This is an extraordinary opportunity for an individual who is passionate about HPIO’s mission, is supportive of HPIO’s commitment to advancing equity and has a track record of board leadership and/or health policy leadership. 

Service on the HPIO Board of Directors is without remuneration.


New HPIO brief explores connections between criminal justice and health

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio has released a new brief titled  Connections between Criminal Justice and Health.

According to the brief, “The research evidence is clear that poor mental health and addiction are risk factors for criminal justice involvement and that incarceration is detrimental to health.”

The brief highlights the many factors that impact both criminal justice and health outcomes, finding that:

  • There is a two-way relationship between criminal justice and health. Mental health and addiction challenges can lead to arrest and incarceration, and incarceration contributes to poor behavioral and physical health for many Ohioans.
  • Racism and community conditions contribute to criminal justice involvement and poor health. Racist and discriminatory policies and practices and community conditions, such as poverty, housing instability and exposure to trauma, lead to increased criminal justice involvement and drive poor health outcomes.
  • Improvement is possible. There are evidence-informed policy solutions to combat the drivers of criminal justice involvement and poor health outcomes.

The brief includes 15 specific evidence-informed policy options focused on:

  • Supporting mental well-being and improving crisis response for people at higher risk of criminal justice involvement
  • Reducing the number of people incarcerated in Ohio
  • Improving health for people who are currently or formerly incarcerated
  • Improving community conditions for people who are at higher risk of criminal justice involvement