HPIO news

HPIO report summarizes maternal, infant health outcomes from Columbus housing project

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio recently completed a final report summarizing the outcome and process evaluation results of CelebrateOne's Healthy Beginnings at Home (HBAH) housing stabilization pilot program, which is designed to improve maternal and infant health outcomes for families with low incomes in the Columbus area. A nine-page executive summary and a longer final report are available. 

The report includes five key findings and 16 recommendations and policy changes to strengthen HBAH replication and improve housing and health outcomes for pregnant women and their families. Insights from the evaluation can be valuable for other programs in Ohio that aim to improve maternal and infant health through housing interventions. 

This report builds upon the following work: 


ICYMI: HPIO brief explores connections between criminal justice and health

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio last week released a new brief titled, Connections between Criminal Justice and Health.

According to the brief, “The research evidence is clear that poor mental health and addiction are risk factors for criminal justice involvement and that incarceration is detrimental to health.”

The brief highlights the many factors that impact both criminal justice and health outcomes, finding that:

  • There is a two-way relationship between criminal justice and health. Mental health and addiction challenges can lead to arrest and incarceration, and incarceration contributes to poor behavioral and physical health for many Ohioans.
  • Racism and community conditions contribute to criminal justice involvement and poor health. Racist and discriminatory policies and practices and community conditions, such as poverty, housing instability and exposure to trauma, lead to increased criminal justice involvement and drive poor health outcomes.
  • Improvement is possible. There are evidence-informed policy solutions to combat the drivers of criminal justice involvement and poor health outcomes.

The brief includes 15 specific evidence-informed policy options focused on:

  • Supporting mental well-being and improving crisis response for people at higher risk of criminal justice involvement
  • Reducing the number of people incarcerated in Ohio
  • Improving health for people who are currently or formerly incarcerated
  • Improving community conditions for people who are at higher risk of criminal justice involvement

HPIO seeks new board directors

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio is seeking candidates for its Board of Directors.

The call for candidates and application are posted on the HPIO website

The HPIO Board of Directors is comprised of leaders from the nonprofit, for-profit and public sectors who are dedicated to the organization’s mission and share our commitment to equity. HPIO and its board are built on a foundation of shared values — fact-based and data-driven analysis; integrity and transparency; diversity and inclusion; ethical decision-making; relevancy; and collaboration and partnership.  

Selected board directors will understand how state policy is created and will have achieved leadership stature in healthcare, business, government, philanthropy or the nonprofit sector. Their accomplishments will allow them to attract other well-qualified, high-performing board directors. 

This is an extraordinary opportunity for an individual who is passionate about HPIO’s mission, is supportive of HPIO’s commitment to advancing equity and has a track record of board leadership and/or health policy leadership. 

Service on the HPIO Board of Directors is without remuneration.


New HPIO brief explores connections between criminal justice and health

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio has released a new brief titled  Connections between Criminal Justice and Health.

According to the brief, “The research evidence is clear that poor mental health and addiction are risk factors for criminal justice involvement and that incarceration is detrimental to health.”

The brief highlights the many factors that impact both criminal justice and health outcomes, finding that:

  • There is a two-way relationship between criminal justice and health. Mental health and addiction challenges can lead to arrest and incarceration, and incarceration contributes to poor behavioral and physical health for many Ohioans.
  • Racism and community conditions contribute to criminal justice involvement and poor health. Racist and discriminatory policies and practices and community conditions, such as poverty, housing instability and exposure to trauma, lead to increased criminal justice involvement and drive poor health outcomes.
  • Improvement is possible. There are evidence-informed policy solutions to combat the drivers of criminal justice involvement and poor health outcomes.

The brief includes 15 specific evidence-informed policy options focused on:

  • Supporting mental well-being and improving crisis response for people at higher risk of criminal justice involvement
  • Reducing the number of people incarcerated in Ohio
  • Improving health for people who are currently or formerly incarcerated
  • Improving community conditions for people who are at higher risk of criminal justice involvement

HPIO releases Ohio Medicaid Basics 2021

Earlier this week, the Health Policy Institute of Ohio released Ohio Medicaid Basics 2021.

Medicaid pays for healthcare services for more than three million Ohioans with low incomes, including almost 1.3 million children. Federal and state expenditures on Medicaid accounted for about 38% of Ohio’s budget in state fiscal year 2020. And $1 out of every $6 spent on health care in the U.S. is spent on Medicaid.

As the payor of healthcare services for more than a quarter of all Ohioans, Medicaid can be leveraged to make large-scale policy changes that impact the health of residents. 

Released to coincide with the state biennial budget, Ohio Medicaid Basics provides a foundational summary of the state-federal program. The 2021 edition provides an overview of Ohio Medicaid eligibility, enrollment and financing. The brief also includes an update of significant changes to Ohio Medicaid in the past year.

HPIO has created Medicaid Basics every two years since 2005.


HPIO seeking candidates for policy analyst position

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio is seeking applicants for a full-time health policy analyst position. 

The position will be part of a collaborative team focused on providing the independent and nonpartisan analysis needed to create evidence-informed state health policy.

Information about specific responsibilities and qualifications of the position, as well as how to apply, are available by clicking here. The deadline for applications is April 30, 2021.


ICYMI: New HPIO Health Value Dashboard ranks Ohio near bottom

Last week, the Health Policy Institute of Ohio released the latest edition of its Health Value Dashboard.

Ohio ranks 47 in the nation in health value compared to other states and D.C. according to the latest edition of the Dashboard. That means that Ohioans live less healthy lives and spend more on health care than people in most other states. Ohio’s overall health value ranking was 47 in 2014, 46 in 2017 and 46 in 2019.

The Dashboard found that Ohio’s healthcare spending is mostly on costly downstream care to treat health problems. This is largely because of a lack of attention and effective action in the following areas:

  • Children. Childhood adversity and trauma have long-term consequences
  • Equity. Ohioans with the worst outcomes face systemic disadvantages
  • Prevention. Sparse public health workforce leads to missed opportunities for prevention

Ohio ranks near bottom in latest HPIO Health Value Dashboard

Ohio ranks 47 in the nation in health value compared to other states and D.C. according to the latest edition of the Health Value Dashboard, which was released earlier this week by the Health Policy Institute of Ohio.

“Ohioans live less healthy lives and spend more on health care than people in most other states,” according to the Dashboard.

Ohio has consistently ranked near the bottom on health value in each of the four editions of the Dashboard. Ohio’s overall health value ranking was 47 in 2014, 46 in 2017 and 46 in 2019. 

The Dashboard found that Ohio’s healthcare spending is mostly on costly downstream care to treat health problems. This is largely because of a lack of attention and effective action in the following areas:

  • Children. Childhood adversity and trauma have long-term consequences
  • Equity. Ohioans with the worst outcomes face systemic disadvantages
  • Prevention. Sparse public health workforce leads to missed opportunities for prevention

The Dashboard is a tool to track Ohio’s progress toward health value — a composite measure of Ohio’s performance on population health and healthcare spending. In ranked profiles, the Dashboard examines Ohio’s rank and trend performance relative to other states across seven domains. In addition, through a series of equity profiles, the Dashboard highlights gaps in outcomes between groups for some of Ohio’s most systematically disadvantaged populations.

The Dashboard includes examples of nine evidence-informed policies that could be adopted by Ohio policymakers and private-sector partners to make Ohio a leader in health value.


HPIO fact sheet highlights connection between affordable housing, health equity

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio released a new fact sheet titled “Housing Affordability and Health Equity,” which explores the connection between affordable and safe housing and health.

According to the fact sheet, “Quality, affordable housing is vital for Ohio families to maintain stable employment and long-term health. Low wages, a lack of safe and affordable housing and the impacts of racism and housing discrimination result in many Ohioans spending a significant portion of their income on poor quality housing in neighborhoods that are disconnected from necessary resources, including high-quality health care and high paying jobs.”

The fact sheet notes:

  • About one-fifth of white Ohio renters (21%) spent over 50% of their income on housing in 2017. This housing cost burden was even higher for Latino and Black Ohioans.
  • Many workers were not paid enough to afford a 2-bedroom apartment at fair market rent (FMR) in Ohio in 2020.
  • There were only 42 affordable rental units for every 100 renter households with incomes at or below the poverty line or 30% area median income in Ohio in 2019.

The fact sheet also includes links to existing state plans and resources that include evidence-based strategies policymakers can focus on to improve housing affordability in Ohio.