HPIO news

Graphic of the week

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A critical aspect of preventing adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) is ensuring that children have a strong start in life and home visiting is a key prevention strategy.

According to an estimate from the Ohio Department of Health, more than 83% of Ohioans who need home visiting are not enrolled in a program identified as “evidence-based” by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) review (as illustrated in the graphic above).

Analysis from HPIO has found that home visiting programs are an evidence-based, multi-generational strategy proven to prevent and mitigate the impacts of ACEs. Trained providers (home visitors) visit expectant parents and families with infants and young children, providing one-on-one support for healthy parent and child development, early education and family needs. Participation in home visiting programs is typically voluntary.

These findings will be included in a new policy brief that HPIO plans to release next month as part of its Ohio ACEs Impact project.


HPIO seeking candidates for program evaluation and policy positions

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio is seeking applicants for the following full-time positions:

All three positions would be key members of a highly collaborative team and would support HPIO’s mission to advance evidence-informed policies that improve health, advance equity, and lead to sustainable healthcare spending.

Information about specific responsibilities and qualifications for the positions, as well as how to apply, are posted on HPIO’s website.


Firearms most common method of suicide in Ohio, HPIO analysis finds

SuicideMethodsTrend_StandaloneGraphic_09.16.2022

Firearms are the most common method of suicide in Ohio, according to analysis from the Health Policy Institute of Ohio (as illustrated in the graphic above).

Between 2007 and 2021 (the most-recent year in which data is available), the rate of suicide deaths in Ohio that involved a firearm increased by more than 50%. In 2021, suicides involving a firearm accounted for more deaths than all other means combined.

Suicide is preventable and the state’s 2020-2022 Suicide Prevention Plan include evidence-informed strategies that both public- and private-sector leaders can implement to address the issue.

September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. If you or someone you know is experiencing emotional distress or a suicidal crisis, please call the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline, the Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 or the Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, consider using the Crisis Text Line at www.crisistextline.org or text “4HOPE” to 741-741.


HPIO seeking candidates for program evaluation and policy positions

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio is seeking applicants for the following full-time positions:

All three positions would be key members of a highly collaborative team and would support HPIO’s mission to advance evidence-informed policies that improve health, advance equity, and lead to sustainable healthcare spending.

Information about specific responsibilities and qualifications for the positions, as well as how to apply, are posted on HPIO’s website.


HPIO brief explores impact of pretrial incarceration, money bail system on health, safety and well-being of Ohioans

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HPIO has released a new policy brief that explores the impact of pretrial incarceration and the money bail system on the health, safety and well-being of Ohioans and their communities. It is the latest in a series of HPIO publications on the connections between criminal justice and health.

The brief, Pretrial Incarceration and the Bail System, includes state and local policy options to reform the money bail system, including options for courts, local governments, prosecutors and the state legislature.

Analysis from 2019 found the number of Ohioans incarcerated pretrial has increased since 2016, and 61% of people in local jails have not been convicted of a crime (outlined in graphic above).

HPIO will be hosting a free 30-minute webinar on the findings in the brief from 1 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 29. To register, visit: www.hpio.net/criminal-justice-and-health
 
Downloadable graphics and key data points from the publication, which can be used in presentations and reports, are available on HPIO’s Criminal Justice and Health Facts & Figures page.

This brief was financially assisted by the Ohio State Bar Foundation.


HPIO launches Facts and Figures resource pages with downloadable graphics, key data points

HPIO has launched a series of resource pages that include a collection of graphics and key data points from HPIO publications.

The Institute encourages stakeholders to use data and graphics from its publications in their own work (presentations, reports, etc.). The Facts and Figures pages include suggested citation guidelines.

Initial topics covered in the Facts and Figures pages are:


HPIO seeking candidates for program evaluation, policy positions

HPIO is seeking applicants for full-time Director of Policy and Program EvaluationPolicy and Program Evaluation Analyst and Policy Analyst — Healthcare access, quality and spending positions.

All three positions would be key members of a highly collaborative team and would support HPIO’s mission to advance evidence-informed policies that improve health, advance equity, and lead to sustainable healthcare spending.

Information about specific responsibilities and qualifications for the positions, as well as how to apply, are posted on HPIO’s website. The deadline for applications is Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022. 


Graphic of the week

CJH_Standalone_08.19.2022
Over the past year, HPIO has explored the connections between criminal justice and health.
 
The research evidence is clear that poor mental health and addiction are risk factors for criminal justice involvement and that incarceration is detrimental to health (see graphic above).
 
Obstacles to health and well-being are particularly striking for Ohioans who are at highest risk of criminal justice involvement.
 
Next month, HPIO plans to release the third in a series of policy briefs on the topic. The latest edition will explore pretrial incarceration and the bail system.
 
The first brief in the series provides foundational analysis on the connection between criminal justice and health and the second brief explored insights on justice and race.
 
All briefs in the series include evidence-informed policy options to improve the health, safety and well-being of Ohioans.


Graphic of the week

MedianIncome_YPLL_StandAloneGraphic_Final
Data released earlier this year from County Health Rankings show that Black Ohioans have the lowest median household income among groups of Ohioans and have, by far, the highest rate of premature death (years of potential life lost before age 75, which reflects the burden of deaths that potentially could have been prevented).

Between 2018 and 2020, Black Ohioans collectively lost 13,374 years of life before turning 75 years old (see graphic above, which was originally released by HPIO in April). That is nearly as many years lost as Hispanic (5,858) and white Ohioans (8,224) combined.  At the same time, the median household income for Black Ohioans is $12,352 less than Hispanic Ohioans, $28,065 less than white Ohioans and $43,782 less than Asian Ohioans.

“Individual efforts alone cannot overcome the structural barriers that maintain the racial wealth divide,” County Health Rankings states. “Structural barriers include laws, policies, institutional practices, and economic arrangements that create unequal conditions.”

The latest edition of the County Health Rankings includes a curated list of strategies to address racial wealth building, a key to eliminating health disparities.


Graphic of the week

Dashboard_DisparitiesGraphic_StandAlone

 

HPIO’s 2021 Health Value Dashboard concluded that one reason Ohio ranks poorly (47th out of the 50 states and D.C.) is that many Ohioans experience poorer outcomes and live shorter lives because of policies, systems and beliefs that discriminate against and unfairly limit access to resources. According to the Dashboard, racism and other forms of discrimination drive troubling differences in outcomes across Ohio. This includes racist and discriminatory beliefs and interactions among Ohioans and structural racism and discrimination embedded within systems and across sectors, rooted in ageism, ableism, xenophobia, homophobia and other “isms” or “phobias.”  As the graphic above shows, Ohioans experiencing the worst health outcomes are also more likely to be exposed to risk factors for poor health. These include trauma and adversity, toxic stress, violence and stigma, and inequitable access to resources.

Earlier this week, HPIO hosted the first meeting of its Health Value Dashboard Advisory Group as it begins planning for the 2023 Dashboard. The new edition is expected to be released in March or April 2023.