Health disparities

Graphic of the week

SuicideDisparities_StandAloneGraphic_04.14.2022
As national and state organizations mark September as Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, data show that while suicide deaths among young Ohioans have risen overall in Ohio over the past two decades, the increase has been sharpest among Black Ohioans.

In 1999, the suicide rates for both white Ohioans and Black Ohioans ages 10 to 24 were the same: 6.8 per 100,000 people. By 2020 (the most recent year for which data is available), the rate for white Ohioans had risen to 11.2 (an increase of 64%) and the rate for Black Ohioans had risen to 12.8 (an increase of 88%).

More-recent national research indicates that the disparity in suicide rates may have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Reducing suicide and eliminating disparities are priorities of the Ohio Department of Health’s 2020-2022 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP). Public- and private-sector leaders can implement strategies identified in the SHIP and Ohio’s 2020-2022 Suicide Prevention Plan, including suicide fatality review boards, behavioral health integration with primary care and education on safe storage of lethal means (i.e., firearms and medications).

If you or someone you know is experiencing emotional distress or a suicidal crisis, please call the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline; the Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 or the Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, consider using the Crisis Text Line at www.crisistextline.org or text “4HOPE” to 741-741.


Graphic of the week

Dashboard_DisparitiesGraphic_StandAlone

 

HPIO’s 2021 Health Value Dashboard concluded that one reason Ohio ranks poorly (47th out of the 50 states and D.C.) is that many Ohioans experience poorer outcomes and live shorter lives because of policies, systems and beliefs that discriminate against and unfairly limit access to resources. According to the Dashboard, racism and other forms of discrimination drive troubling differences in outcomes across Ohio. This includes racist and discriminatory beliefs and interactions among Ohioans and structural racism and discrimination embedded within systems and across sectors, rooted in ageism, ableism, xenophobia, homophobia and other “isms” or “phobias.”  As the graphic above shows, Ohioans experiencing the worst health outcomes are also more likely to be exposed to risk factors for poor health. These include trauma and adversity, toxic stress, violence and stigma, and inequitable access to resources.

Earlier this week, HPIO hosted the first meeting of its Health Value Dashboard Advisory Group as it begins planning for the 2023 Dashboard. The new edition is expected to be released in March or April 2023.


Graphic of the week

MaternalMorbidity_Fig3_Standalone
Click to enlarge

Recent analysis by HPIO has found that stark differences in maternal health outcomes signal that not everyone has what they need to live a healthy life before, during and after pregnancy.

The graphic above, from the HPIO fact sheet “Racial and Geographic Disparities in Maternal Morbidity and Mortality,” shows urban and Appalachian counties have the highest rates of maternal morbidity in Ohio. Additionally, across both urban and Appalachian counties, Black mothers have the highest rates of maternal morbidity

According the fact sheet, “High maternal morbidity and mortality rates are preventable. State and local policymakers have many options to address racism and discrimination, inequitable community conditions, toxic stress and poor prenatal care access.”


Report finds flawed Medicare data inhibits analysis of health disparities

Inaccuracies in Medicare's race and ethnicity data have hurt the program’s ability to assess health disparities, a new federal report found (Source: “Flawed Medicare data hampering analysis of health disparities, inspector general says,” Becker’s Payer Issues, June 15).

According to a report from the HHS Office of the Inspector General, Medicare's enrollment data is inconsistent with federal data collection standards, and the inconsistencies "inhibit the work of identifying and improving health disparities within the Medicare population,"

By comparing Medicare data to other federal sources, the report found that Medicare's race and ethnicity data is less accurate for certain groups, particularly for beneficiaries who identified as American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian/Pacific Islander or Hispanic. 

The report includes recommendations that CMS develop its own source of race and ethnicity data, use self-reported race and ethnicity information to improve data for current beneficiaries, develop a process to ensure that the data is as standardized as possible and educate beneficiaries about CMS efforts to improve the race and ethnicity information.


Ohio House approves Medicaid coverage of doulas in attempt to address racial disparities

A bill that is aiming to combat racial disparities in infant and maternal mortality rates passed the Ohio House during a session Wednesday (Source: “Doula services could soon be covered by Medicaid after racial equity bill passes Ohio House,” Ohio Capital Journal, June 9).

House Bill 142 would provide Medicaid coverage for licensed doula services.

Between 2008 and 2017, Black women died during birth about two and a half times more than white women, according to the Ohio Department of Health. Black women also have twice the amount of birth complications, which ODH data show cannot be attributed to factors such as the pregnant person’s income, education, marital status, tobacco/ alcohol use and insurance coverage.

Doulas “can save lives,” said Dorian Wingard, partner and COO of Restoring Our Own Through Transformation (ROOTT), an organization dedicated to addressing the needs of women of color. “They can prevent the death of mothers, they can prevent the death of children.”

Doula services can also result in lower rates of preterm births, as well as help save money for families, according to Wingard.

Republican state Rep. Tom Brinkman, one of the bill’s sponsors, said he convinced his fellow Republicans to vote for the bill by explaining that it could allow Ohio to save money, since doula services lead to fewer preterm births, which are expensive for the state.

“The hardest thing was to talk to my colleagues and say, ‘look, we are going to expand Medicaid, which we don’t necessarily want to do because we’re trying to restrain costs, but what it’s going to do is result in overall savings because we won’t be paying for [as many complications],” Brinkman said.


Study: Communities of color have much higher air pollution rates

A block-by-block analysis of air quality in the San Francisco Bay area found that communities of color are exposed to 55% more of a chemical that contributes to smog than mostly White communities (Source: “Block-by-block data shows pollution’s stark toll on people of color,” Washington Post, May 25).

The data released Tuesday by Aclima, a California-based tech company that measured the region’s air quality block-by-block for the first time. While the Environmental Protection Agency gauges an area’s air quality with fixed monitors, the new survey unearthed more granular data by sending low-emission vehicles equipped with sophisticated technology to traverse neighborhoods at least 20 times each.

These forays revealed that poor people of all ethnicities experience a 30% higher exposure to nitrogen dioxide compared to wealthier residents, and concentrations can vary up to 800% from one end of a block to the next.


Newly released County Health Rankings spotlights connection between income and health

MedianIncome_YPLL_StandAloneGraphic_Final
Newly released data from County Health Rankings show that Black Ohioans have the lowest median household income among groups of Ohioans and have, by far, the highest rate of premature death (years of potential life lost before age 75, which reflects the burden of deaths that potentially could have been prevented).
 
Between 2018 and 2020, Black Ohioans collectively lost 13,374 years of life before turning 75 years old (see graphic above). That is nearly as many years lost as Hispanic (5,858) and white Ohioans (8,224) combined.  At the same time, the median household income for Black Ohioans is $12,352 less than Hispanic Ohioans, $28,065 less than white Ohioans and $43,782 less than Asian Ohioans.
 
“Individual efforts alone cannot overcome the structural barriers that maintain the racial wealth divide,” County Health Rankings states. “Structural barriers include laws, policies, institutional practices, and economic arrangements that create unequal conditions.”
 
The latest edition of the County Health Rankings, released this week, includes a new curated list of strategies to address racial wealth building, a key to eliminating health disparities.
 
“Research shows that income inequality has a negative effect on overall population health,” according to the Rankings. “Economically unequal societies often have higher rates of physical and mental illness, violence, and incarceration.”

Throughout April, HPIO has marked National Minority Health Month by creating a series of data visualizations to illustrate health disparities in Ohio.


FDA moves to ban menthol cigarettes with aim of reducing smoking-related disparities

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Thursday announced a plan to ban sales of menthol-flavored cigarettes in the United States, a measure many public health experts hailed as the government’s most meaningful action in more than a decade of tobacco control efforts (Source: “F.D.A. Moves to Ban Sales of Menthol Cigarettes,” New York Times, April 28).
 
The ban would most likely have the deepest impact on Black smokers, nearly 85% of whom use menthol cigarettes, compared with 29% of white smokers, according to a government survey. If effective in reducing smoking, the ban could significantly diminish the burden of chronic disease and limit the number of lives cut short by one of the most hazardous legal products available.
 
Public health experts say menthol cigarettes have been heavily marketed to Black people, to devastating effect: African American men have the highest rates of lung cancer in America, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


States adopt policies to require implicit bias training for health workers

In the past three years, states have begun training medical providers to stop acting on unconsciously held beliefs, known as implicit bias (Source: “With Implicit Bias Hurting Patients, Some States Train Doctors,” Pew Stateline, April 21).
 
Since 2019, at least four states — California, Maryland, Michigan and Washington — have adopted policies requiring at least some healthcare workers to take implicit bias training, some as a prerequisite for professional licensure or renewal.
 
Bills on implicit bias training in health care have been introduced in state legislatures over the past two years in many other states, including Illinois, Indiana, Nebraska, New York, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Vermont. Minnesota passed a law last year requiring obstetrics units to offer implicit bias training.
 
Even without laws, some health systems in recent years began offering or requiring training in implicit bias, as have some medical schools, including Harvard, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York and Ohio State University.


Suicide rates for young Ohioans climb, sharpest rise is among Black Ohioans

SuicideDisparities_StandAloneGraphic_04.14.2022

While suicide deaths among young Ohioans have risen overall in Ohio over the past two decades, the increase has been sharpest among Black Ohioans. 

In 1999, the suicide rates for both white Ohioans and Black Ohioans ages 10 to 24 were the same: 6.8 per 100,000 people. By 2020 (the most recent year for which data is available), the rate for white Ohioans had risen to 11.2 (an increase of 64%) and the rate for Black Ohioans had risen to 12.8 (an increase of 88%).  

More-recent national research indicates that the disparity in suicide rates may have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic.  

Reducing suicide and eliminating disparities are priorities of the Ohio Department of Health’s 2020-2022 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP). Public- and private-sector leaders can implement strategies identified in the SHIP and Ohio’s 2020-2022 Suicide Prevention Plan, including suicide fatality review boards, behavioral health integration with primary care and education on safe storage of lethal means (i.e., firearms and medications). 

This April, HPIO is spotlighting health disparities in Ohio as part of National Minority Health Month.  

If you or someone you know is experiencing emotional distress or a suicidal crisis, please call the National Suicide Hotline toll-free at 1-800-273-8255