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Black, unmarried patients more likely to have negative descriptors in health records, study finds

The language clinicians use in their electronic health record (EHR) notes varies by patients' race, marital status and type of insurance, according to a new study (Source: “Patients who are Black, unmarried or on government insurance described more negatively in EHR, study shows,” Jan. 19).

The Health Affairs study found Black patients were 2.54 times more likely to have one or more negative descriptors in their EHR notes than white patients. It also found patients who are unmarried or enrolled in a government insurance program had higher likelihoods of negative descriptors than patients who were married or enrolled in private or employer-based insurance plans. 

The study's authors said their findings raise concerns about racial bias in healthcare and the possible transmission of stigma through the EHR. They said providers may need self-awareness and bias training to change their language.